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Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal

, Volume 50, Issue 10, pp 668–677 | Cite as

In Vitro Cytobiochemical Potentials and Protective Effects of Bioactive Phytochemicals from Artemisia Turanica

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The current study evaluates chemical constituents and estimates the antimicrobial, antioxidant, ferrous-ion chelating, tyrosinase inhibition, cytotoxic, and radical scavenging activities of the essential oil of Artemisia turanica Krasch. from northeastern Iran. The antibacterial activity of the oil was evaluated by determination of inhibition zones, minimal inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration and decimal reduction time. Phenolic content of the oil was determined using the Folin – Ciocalteu assay. Antioxidant properties of the oil of A. turanica were determined by three methods: the ferric reducing antioxidant power, bleaching of DPPH or radical scavenging activity, and β-carotene-linoleic acid assay. In vitro cytotoxicity was assessed by the MTT assay. Oxygenated monoterpenes, especially 1,8-cineole (35.2%), α-thujone (24.2%), and cis-chrysanthenol (16.8%) were the major components in the oil of A. turanica. Bactericidal kinetics of this oil indicated that E. coli is the most vulnerable (MIC = 2.5 mg/mL, D = 6.43 min). Total phenolic content of the oil was found to be 237.87 ± 6.66 μg GAE/mg oil. The oil exhibited a dose-dependent scavenging of DPPH, nitric oxide, and superoxide anion radicals with IC50 values of 7.00 mg/mL, 9.69 μg, and 14.63 μg, respectively. Ferrous-ion chelating activity of the oil (IC50 = 16.97 μg) was lower than that of EDTA. IC50 values for Hela and lymphocyte cells were calculated to be 17.67 and 3291.49 μg/mL, respectively. The results suggest application of A. turanica oil as a natural antioxidant and anticancer agent.

Key words

Artemisia turanica antimicrobial antioxidant cytotoxicity tyrosinase inhibition Hela cells lymphocytes 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author is grateful to the Islamic Azad University’s (Takestan Branch) research deputy office for the sanction of research grant to conduct the current research (Grant No. TIAU: 50155). I would like to thank sincerely Prof. Rustaiyan for his assistance in the botanical information, Prof. Iraj Rasooli in the medicinal plant research center of Shahed University for his scientific assistance, and Dr. Mozaffarian for help in identifying plant material.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Chemistry, college of science, Takestan BranchIslamic Azad UniversityTakestanIran

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