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Pharmaceutical Chemistry Journal

, Volume 41, Issue 9, pp 489–491 | Cite as

Isolation and biological activity of lipids from licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) roots

  • S. B. Denisova
  • V. T. Danilov
  • S. G. Yunusova
  • V. A. Davydova
  • Yu. I. Murinov
  • F. S. Zarudii
Article

Abstract

Hexane extract of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) roots was obtained and investigated. Hydrocarbons, sterol ethers, triacylglycerides, free fatty acids, and free sterols were identified. The extract contains 70% neutral and 30% polar lipids. It is established that the lipid fraction of licorice roots is more effective than the analogous fraction of rosehip oil in stimulating the reparative regeneration of skin. In addition, this fraction also exhibits pronounced antiinflammatory and antiulcer effects, while being virtually nontoxic. Based on these results, the lipid fraction of licorice roots can be recommended as a parent substance for creating effective preparations in various medicinal forms.

Keywords

Licorice Lipid Fraction Voltaren Free Sterol Parent Substance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. B. Denisova
    • 1
  • V. T. Danilov
    • 1
  • S. G. Yunusova
    • 1
  • V. A. Davydova
    • 1
  • Yu. I. Murinov
    • 1
  • F. S. Zarudii
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Organic Chemistry, Ufa Scientific CenterRussian Academy of SciencesUfa, BashkortostanRussia

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