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Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 62, Issue 3, pp 333–341 | Cite as

Clergy Burnout: Two Different Measures

  • Kelvin J. Randall
Article

Abstract

A modified form of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used alongside the Francis Burnout Inventory’s two scales—the Scale of Emotional Exhaustion in Ministry (SEEM) and the Satisfaction in Ministry Scale (SIMS)—and the shorter form of Eysenck’s Revised Personality Questionnaire. The respondents were Anglican clergy in England and Wales in their seventh year in ministry. SEEM and SIMS were shown to map onto the same personality constructs as the MBI. This suggests that the Francis Burnout Inventory can be used satisfactorily to measure clergy burnout.

Keywords

Burnout Clergy stress Scale of Emotional Exhaustion in Ministry Satisfaction in Ministry Scale 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The modified form of the Maslach Burnout Inventory for use among parochial clergy has been modified and reproduced by special permission of the publisher, Consulting Psychologists Press, Palo Alto, CA 94303, from the MBI–Human Services Survey by Christina Maslach and Susan E. Jackson, copyright 1986 by Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc., all rights reserved. Further reproduction is prohibited without the publisher’s written consent. The publishers refused permission to publish the actual items from the modified form of the Maslach Burnout Inventory in papers reporting the research.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Health, Medical Sciences & SocietyGlyndwr UniversityWrexhamUK

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