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Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 59, Issue 5, pp 585–602 | Cite as

Psychology in Pursuit of Justice: The Lives and Works of Emmanuel Levinas and Ignacio Martín-Baró

  • David M. Goodman
  • Sherry Walling
  • Adam A. Ghali
Article
  • 161 Downloads

Abstract

Psychological research and theory are inherently political and social practices. As such, these authors assert that social justice must be a primary concern of the psychological sciences. In case study format, the authors use the exceptional lives and works of continental philosopher Emmanuel Levinas and social psychologist Ignacio Martín-Baró to exemplify the recognition that justice must be centrally infused into psychological thought and practice. The life and work of philosopher Levinas is characterized by a concern for how Western philosophy has funded constructs of selfhood and identity that have created moral anemia and hampered our responsibility to others. Martín-Baró, a prominent Latin American researcher and educator, found research to be a powerful tool to expose oppressive social systems and widespread deception in an effort to end unjust practices, thereby affecting social change. Biographical material and details concerning their systems of research and thought will be used to illustrate what it means to engage in morally-just research and theorizing within the field of psychology.

Keywords

Social justice Levinas Martín-Baró Research Ethics Oppression Violence 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Goodman
    • 1
  • Sherry Walling
    • 2
  • Adam A. Ghali
    • 3
  1. 1.Cambridge Hospital/Harvard Medical SchoolCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Fresno Pacific UniversityFresnoUSA
  3. 3.Fuller Graduate School of PsychologyPasadenaUSA

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