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Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 55, Issue 4, pp 513–525 | Cite as

From Rogers to Clinebell: Exploring the History of Pastoral Psychology

  • Jill Snodgrass
Original Paper
  • 282 Downloads

Abstract

This essay explores the recent history of pastoral psychology by examining the transition from Carl Rogers’s client-centered therapy as a dominating force to the emergence of Howard Clinebell’s growth counseling. The theory and application of each approach is explored, including an analysis of how the cultural milieu of World War II and the shift to neofreudian thought influenced both Rogers and Clinebell. Finally, this essay demonstrates how Clinebell modified Rogers’s client-centered therapy by combining confrontation with unconditional positive regard.

Keywords

Carl Rogers Client-centered therapy Howard Clinebell Growth counseling History of pastoral psychology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Claremont School of TheologyClaremontUSA

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