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Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 54, Issue 2, pp 93–101 | Cite as

How to Talk to Christian Clients About Their Spiritual Lives: Insights From Postmodern Family Therapy

  • P. Gregg Blanton
Article

Abstract

Responding to literature calling for the integration of Christian spirituality and postmodern thinking, this article presents a more specific discussion of how postmodern family therapy approaches can be used to open therapy to the spiritual lives of Christian clients. In this article, postmodern family therapy approaches are described and the compatibility of postmodern family therapies and Christian thinking are examined. Finally, we see how a clinical practice based upon postmodern ideas can provide pastoral counselors with useful tools for talking with Christian clients about their spiritual lives.

Keywords

postmodern family therapy Christian spirituality 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Human Services at Montreat CollegePastoral Counseling and Growth CenterAsheville
  2. 2.Ashville

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