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Pastoral Psychology

, Volume 53, Issue 5, pp 387–396 | Cite as

Theophostic Ministry: Preliminary Practitioner Survey

  • Fernando Garzon
  • Margaret Poloma
Article

Abstract

This exploratory survey investigated Theophostic Ministry, a recently developed inner healing prayer technique that has simultaneously garnered much anecdotal support and criticism. Specifically, the survey sought to assess who is using Theophostic Ministry, what disorders are being treated, and regular practitioners’ perceptions of this technique’s efficacy. The survey was administered during an advanced training seminar given by Ed Smith, the technique’s developer. Of the 148 participants 74% completed the survey (Respondent N = 111). Survey results suggested a wide variety of people are using Theophostic Ministry - from pastors to lay counselors to psychologists. Overall, the respondents believe this technique is very effective and have used the prayer ministry in treating a wide variety of disorders including some quite complex. Training level issues therefore emerged from this survey’s findings. These issues are explored and recommendations made. The limitations of the survey are discussed.

Keywords

Theophostic Ministry prayer inner healing healing of memories lay counseling 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fernando Garzon
    • 1
    • 3
  • Margaret Poloma
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Psychology and CounselingRegent UniversityVirginia Beach
  2. 2.University of AkronAkron
  3. 3.School of Psychology and CounselingRegent UniversityVirginia Beach

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