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Silica Aerogel for Capturing Intact Interplanetary Dust Particles for the Tanpopo Experiment

  • Makoto Tabata
  • Hajime Yano
  • Hideyuki Kawai
  • Eiichi Imai
  • Yuko Kawaguchi
  • Hirofumi Hashimoto
  • Akihiko Yamagishi
ORIGINS 2014

Abstract

In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles, comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm3 developed using our production technique, were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment.

Keywords

Silica aerogel Cosmic dust International Space Station Astrobiology Tanpopo 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to the members of the Tanpopo Collaboration for their assistance. This study was supported by the Space Plasma Laboratory at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Makoto Tabata
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hajime Yano
    • 2
  • Hideyuki Kawai
    • 1
  • Eiichi Imai
    • 3
  • Yuko Kawaguchi
    • 2
  • Hirofumi Hashimoto
    • 2
  • Akihiko Yamagishi
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsChiba UniversityChibaJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)SagamiharaJapan
  3. 3.Department of BioengineeringNagaoka University of TechnologyNagaokaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Applied Life SciencesTokyo University of Pharmacy and Life SciencesHachiojiJapan

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