The end–means nexus and policy conversion: evidence from two cases in Israeli immigrant integration policy

Abstract

Conversion—redirection of existing tools to new goals—is one strategy of gradual transformative change. This strategy is appealing because it does not require actors to introduce new programs or tools. Despite this appeal, it is not as broadly used as other gradual change strategies. This paper argues that this is because there is an additional condition for conversion. To convert an instrument, agents of change should see the connection between the tool and its original goal as loose. That takes place when actors perceive the tool as generic or when they are part of instrument constituencies and not advocacy coalition. The paper demonstrates this argument using an analysis of a positive and a negative case of conversion from immigrant integration policy in Israel. As such, the paper expands our understanding of conversion, going beyond institutional and political factors.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Israel does not have a formal immigration or integration policy for non-Jewish immigrants such as refugees or economic migrants.

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Shpaizman, I. The end–means nexus and policy conversion: evidence from two cases in Israeli immigrant integration policy. Policy Sci (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11077-020-09392-1

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Keywords

  • Conversion
  • Policy tools
  • Advocacy coalition
  • Integration policy