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Natural Hazards

, Volume 77, Issue 3, pp 1551–1571 | Cite as

Explaining the pre-disaster integration of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs)

  • John Carr
  • Jessica Jensen
Original Paper

Abstract

This study explored the pre-disaster integration of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) within local emergency management systems through semi-structured telephone interviews with 21 CERT program coordinators. It was found that the integration of CERTs varied significantly from not integrated at all to highly integrated. This paper reports the findings related to why this variation occurred. Specifically, it was found that integration seemed to covary with the resources available to the team, the opportunity within the local emergency management system for the CERT to play a role, the team’s leadership, the formality of the team’s structure, and the acceptance of CERT within the local emergency management system.

Keywords

Disaster volunteers Preparedness Disaster response Community response Citizen preparedness programs Community Emergency Response Team 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Emergency ManagementNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA
  2. 2.Emergency and Disaster Management ProgramNorthwest Missouri State UniversityMaryvilleUSA

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