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Natural Hazards

, Volume 64, Issue 1, pp 577–592 | Cite as

General framework and key issues concerning integrated strategies for coping with drought and flood in China in a changing environment

  • Deng-Hua Yan
  • Jing Feng
  • Chuan-Zhe Li
  • Tian-Ling Qin
  • Bai-Sha Weng
  • Xin Jin
Original Paper

Abstract

This paper focused on the development of a framework for collective water resources management in China to meet the change of drought and flood. Based on the observational data of drought and flood from 1950 to 2009 and the precipitation from 1961 to 2010, using the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) method, the evolutionary characteristic of drought and flood was analyzed. The results showed that drought and flood occurred frequently, simultaneous occurrences of drought and flood and the rapid shift between the two were increasing. The framework for collective strategies responding to drought and flood under this ever-changing environment was presented. A series of potential mitigation, prevention, and adaptation strategies were discussed. These included both planning and implementation side strategies. In regard to planning, the strategies for dealing with drought and flood should be shifted from crisis management to collective management, unifying normal and emergency management. Combination risk zoning of drought and flood should be conducted and collective emergency planning should be formulated. Moreover, the regulation capability of water conservancy projects group should be optimized to the highest possible level. In regard to implementation, based on the water resources collective management, rational water allocation for both normal and extreme value processes should be implemented. The water conservancy project groups for the extreme value process should work together, and the flood limit water level of reservoirs should be controlled dynamically.

Keywords

Drought Flood Changing environment Collective strategies China 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Foundation for the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2010CB951102), Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51021066), Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering (Grant No.2011490511), the Foundation of China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research (1232) and the Science and Technology Foundation for Selected Overseas Chinese Scholars, Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security of the People’s Republic of China (Impact of climate change and human activities on hydrological cycle and water resources in the Haihe River Basin). We would also like to thank the editor T.S. Murty and two anonymous reviewers for the valuable comments and suggestions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deng-Hua Yan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jing Feng
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Chuan-Zhe Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Tian-Ling Qin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Bai-Sha Weng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xin Jin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River BasinChina Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower ResearchBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Water ResourcesChina Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower ResearchBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Environmental Science and Engineering DepartmentDonghua UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic EngineeringHohai UniversityNanjingPeople’s Republic of China

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