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Natural Hazards

, Volume 49, Issue 2, pp 411–420 | Cite as

Demarcation of inland vessels’ limit off Mormugao port region, India: a pilot study for the safety of inland vessels using wave modelling

  • P. Vethamony
  • V. M. Aboobacker
  • K. Sudheesh
  • M. T. Babu
  • K. Ashok Kumar
Original Paper

Abstract

The Ministry of Shipping desires to revise the inland vessels’ limit (IVL) notification based on scientific rationale to improve the safety of vessels and onboard personnel. The Mormugao port region extending up to the Panaji was considered for this pilot study. Measured winds and wave parameters (AWS and moored buoy) as well as NCEP re-analysis and NCMRWF winds were used for the analysis and input to regional and local models. The results of wave model were validated with measured significant wave heights (SWHs) and the comparison shows a good match. The analysis indicates that SWHs do not exceed 2.0 m during non-monsoon months, and in monsoon months exceed 5.0 m, and even 7.0 m, especially during extreme events. In order to draw IVL contours for Goa coastal region, local model was set up and nearshore waves were simulated for the period May 2004–May 2005. Based on the nearshore SWH distribution, IVL contours have been fixed for the Mormugao port and Panaji coastal regions.

Keywords

Mormugao port Wave modelling Wave measurements Inland vessels’ limit Wave spectra 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Dr. S.R. Shetye, Director, National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Goa, for his interest in this study and to our colleagues, especially Mr. P.S. Pednekar, for their involvement in data collection.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Vethamony
    • 1
  • V. M. Aboobacker
    • 1
  • K. Sudheesh
    • 1
  • M. T. Babu
    • 1
  • K. Ashok Kumar
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of OceanographyDona PaulaIndia

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