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Natural Hazards

, Volume 44, Issue 2, pp 253–265 | Cite as

A framework for economic loss estimation due to seismic transportation network disruption: a spatial computable general equilibrium approach

  • Hirokazu Tatano
  • Satoshi Tsuchiya
Original Paper

Abstract

This paper presents a framework for assessing the economic impact of disruption in transportation that can relate the physical damage to transportation networks to economic losses. A spatial computable general equilibrium (SCGE) model is formulated and then integrated with a transportation model that can estimate the traffic volumes of freight and passengers. Economic equilibrium under a disruption in the transportation network is computed subject to the condition that the adjustment of labor and capital inputs is restricted; the model reflects slow adjustment of these linked to the state of recovery. As a case study, the model reviews the large Niigata-Chuetsu earthquake of 2004. Considering the damage to the transportation infrastructure, the model indicates the extent of the economic losses arising from the earthquake distributed over regions as a consequence of the intra- and interregional trade in a regional economy. The results show that 20% of the indirect losses occur in the Niigata region directly affected by the earthquake, whereas 40% of the total losses are experienced in the Kanto region and non-negligible losses reach rather remote zones of the country such as Okinawa.

Keywords

Natural disaster Economic impact assessment Indirect loss estimation Spatial computable general equilibrium (SCGE) model 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Disaster Prevention Research InstituteKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringNagaoka University of TechnologyNagaokaJapan

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