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Neuropsychology Review

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 128–157 | Cite as

Disconnexion Syndromes in Animals and Man: Part I

  • Norman Geschwind
Article

Introduction

The early successes of the views of Broca and Wernicke led the classical neurologists to a mode of analysis of the disturbances of the higher neurological functions subsequently to be labelled with the derisive term “diagram-making.” Starting from the picture of the brain as a collection of sets of more or less specialized groups of cells connected by relatively discrete fibre pathways, these classical neurologists deduced a series of symptom complexes. On the basis of this model clinical syndromes could be divided into those resulting from lesions of grey matter and those which resulted from lesions of the white matter interconnecting specialized regions. Thus, cortical syndromes were distinguished from “conduction” syndromes. Basically it was this mode of analysis which dominated the literature until the First World War.

An interest in the connexions between different parts of the speech region and between the speech region and the remainder of the brain dated back to...

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  • Norman Geschwind

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