Advertisement

Neurochemical Research

, Volume 35, Issue 12, pp 2070–2077 | Cite as

Alpha-Lipoic Acid Modulates GFAP, Vimentin, Nestin, Cyclin D1 and MAP-Kinase Espression in Astroglial Cell Cultures

  • V. Bramanti
  • D. Tomassoni
  • D. Bronzi
  • S. Grasso
  • M. Currò
  • M. Avitabile
  • G. Li Volsi
  • M. Renis
  • R. Ientile
  • F. Amenta
  • R. Avola
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

In the present study, we evaluated the expression of some proliferation and differentiation markers in 15 DIV astrocyte cultures pretreated or not with 0.5 mM glutamate for 24 h and than maintained under chronic or acute treatment with 50 μM R(+)enantiomer or raceme alpha-lipoic acid (ALA). GFAP expression significantly increased after (R+)enantiomer acute-treatment and also in glutamate-pretreated ones. Vimentin expression increased after R(+)enantiomer acute-treatment, but it decreased after raceme acute-treatment. Nestin expression drastically increased after acute raceme-treatment in glutamate-pretreated or not cultures, but significantly decreased after (R+)enantiomer acute and chronic-treatments. Cyclin D1 expression increased in raceme acute-treated cultures pretreated with glutamate. MAP-kinase expression slightly increased after (R+)enantiomer acute treatment in glutamate-pretreated or unpretreated ones. These preliminary findings may better clarify antioxidant and metabolic role played by ALA in proliferating and differentiating astrocyte cultures suggesting an interactive cross-talk between glial and neuronal cells, after brain lesions or damages.

Keywords

Alpha-lipoic acid Cytoscheletal proteins Cyclin D1 MAP-kinase Astroglial cell cultures 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The authors particularly acknowledged Prof. Abel Lajtha, Editor in Chief of this prestigious International journal, excellent scientific guide, who contributed greatly to stimulate the development and advancement of international neurochemical research. In addition, the authors are very grateful to Prof. Anna Maria Giuffrida Stella, mentor of Prof. Roberto Avola, for excellent scientific suggestions and advices given during the preparation of this manuscript. The authors wish to thank very much the MDM Monza Italy for the financial support given to Prof. Roberto Avola’s research group and particularly to Dr. Roberto Gabriele.

References

  1. 1.
    Reed LJ (2001) A trail of research from lipoic acid to alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complexes. J Biol Chem 276:38329–38336CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Jones W, Li X, Qu ZC et al (2002) Uptake, recycling, and antioxidant actions of alpha-lipoic acid in endothelial cells. Free Radic Biol Med 33:83–93CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Suh JH, Shenvi SV, Dixon BM et al (2004) Decline in transcriptional activity of Nrf2 causes age-related loss of glutathione synthesis, which is reversible with lipoic acid. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:3381–3386CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Smith AR, Shenvi SV, Widlansky M et al (2004) Lipoic acid as a potential therapy for chronic diseases associated with oxidative stress. Curr Med Chem 11:1135–1146PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kramer K, Packer L, Hoppe P (2001) R-alpha-lipoic acid. Nutraceuticals in Health and Disease Prevention. Marcel Dekker, Inc, New York, pp 129–164Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Estrada DE, Ewart HS, Tsakiridis T et al (1996) Stimulation of glucose uptake by the natural coenzyme alpha-lipoic acid/thioctic acid: participation of elements of the insulin signaling pathway. Diabetes 45:1798–1804CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Khanna S, Roy S, Packer L et al (1999) Cytokine-induced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle: redox regulation and the role of alpha-lipoic acid. Am J Physiol 276:R1327–R1333PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Pick U, Haramaki N, Constantinescu A et al (1995) Glutathione reductase and lipoamide dehydrogenase have opposite stereospecificities for alpha-lipoic acid enantiomers. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 206:724–730CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Packer L, Tritschler HJ, Wessel K (1997) Neuroprotection by the metabolic antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid. Free Radic Biol Med 22:359–378CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Evans JL, Goldfine ID (2000) Alpha-lipoic acid: a multifunctional antioxidant that improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Technol Ther 2:401–413CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Ou P, Tritschler HJ, Wolff SP (1995) Thioctic (lipoic) acid: a therapeutic metal-chelating antioxidant? Biochem Pharmacol 50:123–126CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Muller U, Krieglstein J (1995) Prolonged pre-treatment with alpha-lipoic acid protects cultured neurons against hypoxic, glutamate-, or iron-induced injury. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 15:624–630PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Bramanti V, Tomassoni D, Avitabile M et al (2010) Biomarkers of glial cell proliferation and differentiation in culture. Front Biosci (Schol Ed) 2:558–570CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Bramanti V, Bronzi D, Tomassoni D et al (2008) Growth factors and steroid mediated regulation of cytoskeletal protein expression in serum-deprived primary astrocyte cultures. Neurochem Res 33(12):2593–2600CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Prezzavento O, Campisi A, Ronsisvalle S et al (2007) Novel sigma receptor ligands: synthesis and biological profile. J Med Chem 50(5):951–961CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Bramanti V, Campisi A, Tomassoni D et al (2007) Astroglial-conditioned media and growth factors modulate proliferation and differentiation of astrocytes in primary culture. Neurochem Res 32(1):49–56CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Gomes FCA, Garcia-Abreu J, Galou M, Paulin D et al (1999) Neurons induce glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene promoter of astrocytes derived from transgenic mice. Glia 26(2):97–108CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Teichert J, Hermann R, Ruus P et al (2003) Plasma kinetics, metabolism, and urinary excretion of alpha-lipoic acid following oral administration in healthy volunteers. J Clin Pharmacol 43(11):1257–1267CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Salinthone S, Yadav V, Bourdette D N et al (2008) Lipoic acid: A novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis and other chronic inflammatory diseases of the CNS endocrine. Metab Immune Disord—Drug Targets 8:132–142CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Bramanti
    • 1
  • D. Tomassoni
    • 2
  • D. Bronzi
    • 3
  • S. Grasso
    • 1
  • M. Currò
    • 4
  • M. Avitabile
    • 5
  • G. Li Volsi
    • 3
  • M. Renis
    • 5
  • R. Ientile
    • 4
  • F. Amenta
    • 2
  • R. Avola
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Chemical Sciences, Section of Biochemistry and Molecular biologyUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly
  2. 2.School of Pharmacy, Section of Human AnatomyUniversity of CamerinoCamerinoItaly
  3. 3.Dept. of Physiological SciencesUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly
  4. 4.Dept. of Biochemical, Physiological and Nutritional SciencesUniversity of MessinaMessinaItaly
  5. 5.Dept. of Biological Chemistry, Medical Chemistry and molecular biologyUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly

Personalised recommendations