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Neurochemical Research

, Volume 31, Issue 8, pp 1035–1044 | Cite as

Oligonucleotide-based Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes in Hippocampus of Transgenic Mice Expressing NSE-controlled APPsw

  • Seung W. Jee
  • Jung S. Cho
  • Chuel K. Kim
  • Dae Y. Hwang
  • Sun B. Shim
  • Su H. Lee
  • Ji S. Sin
  • Jin H. Park
  • Yang S. Kim
  • Soo Y. Choi
  • Yong K. Kim
Original Paper

Abstract

The complexity of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has made it difficult to examine its underlying mechanisms. A gene microarray offers a solution to the complexity through parallel analysis of most of the genes expressed in the hippocampal tissues from AD-transgenic and age-matched control littermates. This study examined the potential effect of APPsw over-expression on the modulation of genes for AD. To accomplish this, an oligonucleotide array was used with the large-scale screening of the hippocampus mRNA from 12-month-old APPsw-transgenic and control mice. There was a total of 116 differentially expressed genes, 59 up-regulated and 57 down-regulated, in the hippocampal region of the transgenic mice compared with the control mice. Initially, two of each of the down-regulated (Xlr3b and Mup3) and up-regulated genes (Serpina9 and Ccr6) were chosen for further investigation if the magnitude of change in these genes on the oligonucleotide array would correspond to those in the RT-PCR analysis from APPsw-transgenic mice. We also found that the changes in the differentially expressed genes are reliable. Thus, these genes might associate with AD neuropathology in neurodegenerative process of AD, although relevance of long lists altered genes should be evaluated in a future study.

Keywords

Alzheimer Oligonucleotide array Transgenic APPsw 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to acknowledge both Sun M. Choi, B.S. and Mi K. Jang, M.S., animal technicians, for directing the animal facility at the Team of Laboratory Animal Resources. This research was supported by grants to Dr Yong K. Kim from the Korea Health 21 R&D project, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea (A040042) and the Korea FDA.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seung W. Jee
    • 1
  • Jung S. Cho
    • 1
  • Chuel K. Kim
    • 1
  • Dae Y. Hwang
    • 1
  • Sun B. Shim
    • 1
  • Su H. Lee
    • 1
  • Ji S. Sin
    • 1
  • Jin H. Park
    • 1
  • Yang S. Kim
    • 3
  • Soo Y. Choi
    • 2
  • Yong K. Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Team of Laboratory Animal ResourcesNational Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea FDASeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea FDASeoulRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Oriental PhysiologyKyunghee UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea

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