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Neurochemical Research

, Volume 29, Issue 12, pp 2311–2315 | Cite as

Baseline Plasma GABA: Its Relationship to the Adverse Effects of Acute Lorazepam Administration on Cognition in the Elderly

  • Nunzio Pomara
  • Lisa M. Willoughby
  • John J. Sidtis
  • P. Murali Doraiswamy
  • Keith  A. Wesnes
  • Thomas B. Cooper
  • David J. Greenblatt
Article

Abstract

The GABA system is an active target for drugs to treat a variety of disorders and the availability of an indirect measure of central GABA activity would not only enhance psychiatric research, but also permit assessment of the pharmacodynamic effects of drugs designed to act on this system. The relationships between plasma baseline pre-drug GABA concentrations and cognitive impairments induced by an acute oral dose of lorazepam (0.5 and 1.0 mg) were investigated in 22 healthy elderly individuals. Partial correlations controlling for plasma lorazepam concentrations revealed no significant relationship between baseline plasma GABA levels and lorazepam-induced impairments on tests of cognitive functioning. Plasma GABA concentration does not appear to be a useful marker of susceptibility to benzodiazepine-induced cognitive toxicity in the elderly. Other approaches to estimating central GABA activity should be pursued.

Keywords

Cognitive Impairment Oral Dose Cognitive Functioning Elderly Individual Partial Correlation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nunzio Pomara
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lisa M. Willoughby
    • 1
  • John J. Sidtis
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Murali Doraiswamy
    • 3
  • Keith  A. Wesnes
    • 4
  • Thomas B. Cooper
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  • David J. Greenblatt
    • 7
  1. 1.Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric ResearchOrangeburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryDuke University Medical CenterUK
  4. 4.Cognitive Drug ResearchGoring-on-Thames, OxonUK
  5. 5.Analytical Psychopharmacology LaboratoriesNew York State Psychiatric InstituteUSA
  6. 6.Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians & SurgeonsColumbia UniversityUSA
  7. 7.Department of Pharmacology & Experimental TherapeuticsTufts University School of MedicineBostonUSA

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