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Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 117, Issue 2, pp 359–364 | Cite as

Ependymoma in children under the age of 3 years: a report from the Canadian Pediatric Brain Tumour Consortium

  • Eve Purdy
  • Donna L. Johnston
  • Ute Bartels
  • Chris Fryer
  • Anne-Sophie Carret
  • Bruce Crooks
  • David D. Eisenstat
  • Lucie Lafay-Cousin
  • Valerie Larouche
  • Beverly Wilson
  • Shayna Zelcer
  • Mariana Silva
  • Eric Bouffet
  • Daniel Keene
  • Douglas R. Strother
Clinical Study

Abstract

The determination of optimal therapy for ependymoma (EP) in infants is ongoing. We describe the incidence, management and outcomes of Canadian infants with EP to discern potential future research questions. Of 579 cases registered in a national database of children <36 months of age diagnosed with a brain tumor from 1990 to 2005, inclusive, 75 (13 %) were EP. These cases were analyzed. A mean annual age-adjusted incidence rate of 4.6 per 100,000 children years was calculated. The male:female ratio was 1.77. Of the tumors, 80 % were infratentorial in location, 67 % were WHO grade II histology, and 29 % were metastatic at diagnosis. All patients underwent a surgical procedure. A complete resection of the tumor was achieved in 56 % of the cases; 43 % of these patients survive while 36 % of the patients with tumors less than completely resected survive. Initial therapy consisted of surgery alone in 23 % of patients, or surgery plus chemotherapy (37 %), radiation therapy (RT; 19 %), or both (21 %). Any use of RT increased with patient age. The 5-year EFS rates for patients in each of the four treatment groups was 22, 11.5, 46.2 and 64.8 %, respectively. For all patients the median survival was 63 ± 6 months and 5-year overall survival was 55 ± 6 %. Patients treated with surgery and chemotherapy alone were younger and had a lower rate of survival than older patients who were more often treated with radiation therapy containing regimens. Further study is needed to determine which patients are optimally served with these treatment modalities.

Keywords

Ependymoma Infants Therapy Less than 3 years of age 

Notes

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eve Purdy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Donna L. Johnston
    • 3
  • Ute Bartels
    • 4
  • Chris Fryer
    • 5
  • Anne-Sophie Carret
    • 6
  • Bruce Crooks
    • 7
  • David D. Eisenstat
    • 8
  • Lucie Lafay-Cousin
    • 1
  • Valerie Larouche
    • 9
  • Beverly Wilson
    • 8
  • Shayna Zelcer
    • 10
  • Mariana Silva
    • 11
  • Eric Bouffet
    • 4
  • Daniel Keene
    • 12
  • Douglas R. Strother
    • 1
  1. 1.Pediatric Oncology and Blood and Marrow TransplantAlberta Children’s HospitalCalgaryCanada
  2. 2.Faculty of MedicineQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada
  3. 3.Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of PediatricsChildren’s Hospital of Eastern OntarioOttawaCanada
  4. 4.Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoCanada
  5. 5.British Columbia Children’s HospitalVancouverCanada
  6. 6.Hôpital Ste JustineMontrealCanada
  7. 7.IWK Health CentreHalifaxCanada
  8. 8.Stollery Children’s HospitalEdmontonCanada
  9. 9.Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de QuebecQuebec CityCanada
  10. 10.Children’s Hospital of Western OntarioLondonCanada
  11. 11.Kingston General HospitalKingstonCanada
  12. 12.Division of NeurologyChildren’s Hospital of Eastern OntarioOttawaCanada

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