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Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 87, Issue 2, pp 189–191 | Cite as

Epstein–Barr virus-associated T/NK cell-type central nervous system lymphoma which manifested as a post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in a renal transplant recipient

  • Nobuhiko Omori
  • Hisashi Narai
  • Tomotaka Tanaka
  • Shinichiro Tanaka
  • Ichiro Yamadori
  • Koichi Ichimura
  • Tadashi Yoshino
  • Koji Abe
  • Yasuhiro Manabe
Letter to the editor

Abstract

A 31-year-old male, who had received a cadaveric renal allograft in April 2003, consulted a clinic for a transient hemiplegia in August 2004. At that time, a course observation without medication was chosen. In October 2004, he was admitted to our hospital by ambulance with a clonic seizure and a recurrence of hemiplegia on the right side of his body. Head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enhanced multifocal nodular lesions with remarkable cerebral edema mainly in the left frontal lobe. A stereotactic brain biopsy was performed, and the pathological diagnosis was nasal type extranodal T/NK cell lymphoma manifested as the post transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Systemic staging workups showed no extra-CNS involvement. Because of his renal dysfunction and no sign of any extra-CNS involvement, a reduction of the immunosuppressants and whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) (40 Gy) without chemotherapy were applied to his therapeutic regimen. After WBRT, MRI showed a remarkable reduction in the number and size of the tumors, and no neurological abnormalities were physically observed. As of December 2006, no sign of recurrence has subsequently been found in both the intra- and extra-CNS.

Keywords

Nasal T/NK cell lymphoma CNS PTLD Renal transplantation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuhiko Omori
    • 1
  • Hisashi Narai
    • 1
  • Tomotaka Tanaka
    • 1
  • Shinichiro Tanaka
    • 2
  • Ichiro Yamadori
    • 3
  • Koichi Ichimura
    • 4
  • Tadashi Yoshino
    • 4
  • Koji Abe
    • 5
  • Yasuhiro Manabe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyNational Hospital Organization Okayama Medical CenterOkayamaJapan
  2. 2.Transplantation CenterNational Hospital Organization Okayama Medical CenterOkayamaJapan
  3. 3.Department of PathologyNational Hospital Organization Okayama Medical CenterOkayamaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Pathology, Postgraduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and PharmacologyOkayama UniversityOkayamaJapan
  5. 5.Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and PharmacologyOkayama UniversityOkayamaJapan

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