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Journal of Neuro-Oncology

, Volume 86, Issue 2, pp 225–229 | Cite as

Brain lymphoma: usefulness of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  • Sophie Taillibert
  • Rémy Guillevin
  • Carole Menuel
  • Marc Sanson
  • Khê Hoang-Xuan
  • Jacques Chiras
  • Hugues Duffau
Clinical-Patient Studies

Abstract

The diagnosis of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) should always be considered as an emergency because of the therapeutic consequences it implies. In immunocompetent patients, it relies on stereotactic biopsy. Unfortunately, clinical and radiological features may be misleading and delay the diagnostic procedure. The case we report here illustrates the contribution of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the diagnostic approach of a very atypical PCNSL.

Keywords

Demyelination Multiple sclerosis Magnetic resonance spectroscopy Primary CNS lymphoma 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sophie Taillibert
    • 1
  • Rémy Guillevin
    • 2
    • 3
  • Carole Menuel
    • 2
  • Marc Sanson
    • 1
  • Khê Hoang-Xuan
    • 1
  • Jacques Chiras
    • 2
  • Hugues Duffau
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Neuro-oncologyPitié Salpêtrière HospitalParisFrance
  2. 2.Department of NeuroradiologyPitié Salpêtrière HospitalParisFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire d’imagerie fonctionnelle, INSERM U678Paris-6 UniversityParisFrance
  4. 4.Department of NeurosurgeryGui de Chauliac HospitalMontpellierFrance

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