Motor Activity and Levels of Expression of mRNA for the Proteins NAP-22 and GAP-43 in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

The aim of the present work was to identify differences in movement activity in SHR and WKY rats and to assess the levels of expression of mRNA for NAP-22 and GAP-43 proteins in neurons in the parietal cortex and hippocampus. Movement activity in SHR and WKY rats (four animals in each group) was measured using a telemetric method over three days. Levels of expression of mRNA for NAP-22 and GAP-43 proteins in parietal cortex and hippocampal neurons in further groups of rats of the same strains (10 animals in each group) were measured in real time by PCR. Studies were carried out using animals from the Biological Collection of the Institute of Physiology, Russian Academy of Sciences. Movement activity in SHR rats was greater than that in WKY rats, though statistically these differences were significant only during the dark phase. Expression levels of mRNA for NAP-22 and GAP-43 proteins in SHR rats were lower than those in WKY rats in both the parietal cortex and the hippocampus. These results lead to the conclusion that the greater mobility in SHR rats reflects the typical hyperactivity of rats of this line, making them a suitable model for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Changes in the expression levels of mRNA for NAP-22 and GAP-43 proteins may be linked with behavioral impairments.

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Correspondence to N. Z. Klyueva.

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Translated from Rossiiskii Fiziologicheskii Zhurnal imeni I. M. Sechenova, Vol. 106, No. 5, pp. 654–662, May, 2020.

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Aldekeeva, A.S., Reznik, S.Y., Kraynova, Y.S. et al. Motor Activity and Levels of Expression of mRNA for the Proteins NAP-22 and GAP-43 in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats. Neurosci Behav Physi 51, 265–269 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11055-021-01065-7

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Keywords

  • SHR rats
  • WKY rats
  • diurnal rhythms
  • movement activity
  • NAP-22 protein
  • GAP-43 protein