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Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 46, Issue 7, pp 839–842 | Cite as

Distribution of Marinesco Bodies in Human Substantia Nigra Neurons

  • I. P. Grigor’ev
  • V. V. Gusel’nikova
  • E. G. Sukhorukova
  • D. E. Korzhevskii
Article
  • 24 Downloads

The aim of the present work was to study the frequency and intranuclear locations of Marinesco bodies in neurons in the substantia nigra of the human brain. Marinesco bodies were detected on substantia nigra sections in five males aged 28–58 years. Nissl staining and a immunohistochemical reaction for ubiquitin – a characteristic protein for these intranuclear inclusions – were used. Marinesco bodies were seen in 1–2% of substantia nigra neurons but not in neighboring areas of the brain. One neuron could contain 1–4 Marinesco bodies of size up to 6.7 × 5.1 μm; bodies were positioned both close to and distant from the nucleolus. Ubiquitin was found in most Marinesco bodies. There was a tendency to an increase in Marinesco bodies in human substantia nigra neurons with age.

Keywords

substantia nigra neuron nucleus Marinesco bodies ubiquitin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. P. Grigor’ev
    • 1
  • V. V. Gusel’nikova
    • 1
  • E. G. Sukhorukova
    • 1
  • D. E. Korzhevskii
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for the Functional Morphology of the Central and Peripheral Nervous System, Department of General and Special Morphology, Research Institute of Experimental Medicine, North-Western BranchRussian Academy of Medical SciencesSt. PetersburgRussia

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