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Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 43, Issue 9, pp 1102–1106 | Cite as

Developmental Dynamics of Morphometric Parameters of the Tibial Nerve in Dogs

  • T. N. Varsegova
Article
  • 37 Downloads

Morphometric studies of the tibial nerve in 10 mongrel puppies aged 2, 4, and 10–11 months and seven adult dogs aged 1–3 years showed that increases in age were associated with decreases in the number density of nerve fibers (NF) and endoneurial microvessels and a significant increase in the proportion of the connective tissue component, as well as increases in all size parameters of myelinated NF. The processes of myelinated NF differentiation and the appearance of mature large NF at age 10 months lead to increases in the heterogeneity of the system, which was accompanied by an increase in entropy. In adult dogs, the population of myelinated NF was characterized by high levels of organization and redundancy, such that it was more deterministic and stable and transmitted information along nerve trunks as communication channels more reliably.

Keywords

tibial nerve nerve fibers endoneurium morphometry information analysis 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Morphology Laboratory (Director: professor Yu. M. Ir’yanov), Russian Scientific Center “Academician G. A. Ilizarov Restorative Traumatology and Orthopedics”KurganRussia

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