Advertisement

Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 43, Issue 8, pp 941–945 | Cite as

Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity in the Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus of Mongolian Gerbils in Ischemic and Reperfusion Injuries

  • N. S. Shcherbak
  • M. M. Galagudza
  • D. A. Ovchinnikov
  • A. N. Kuz’menkov
  • G. Yu. Yukina
  • E. R. Barantsevich
  • V. V. Tomson
  • E. V. Shlyakhto
Article

The aim of the present work was to analyze changes in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the cytoplasm of neurons in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex on Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) in the early and late reperfusion periods after global ischemia. LDH activity in pyramidal neurons in various hippocampal fields and in neurons in cerebral cortex layers II, III, and V after 7-min forebrain ischemia was found to depend on the locations of these neuron types and the duration of postischemic reperfusion. The dynamics of LDH activity in neurons were characterized by a significant decrease two days after reperfusion, with different levels of normalization by day 7 of the reperfusion period.

Keywords

lactate dehydrogenase brain ischemia-reperfusion Mongolian gerbil 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    L. S. Agroskin and G. V. Papayan, Cytophotometry [in Russian], Nauka, Leningrad (1977).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    O. S. Vinogradova, The Hippocampus and Memory [in Russian], Nauka, Moscow (1975).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    E. I. Gusev and V. I. Skvortsov, Cerebral Ischemia [in Russian], Meditsina, Moscow (2001).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    T. B. Zhuravleva and R. A. Prochukhanov, Introduction to Quantitative Enzyme Histochemistry [in Russian], Meditsina, Moscow (1978).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    N. S. Kolomeets, “Hippocampal pathology in schizophrenia,” Zh. Nevrol. Psikhiat. S. S. Korsakova, 107, 103–114 (2007).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    E. Pearse, Histochemistry Theoretical and Applied [Russian translation], IL Press, Moscow (1962).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    N. S. Shcherbak, M. M. Galagudza, E. M. Nifontov, et al., “Effects of ischemic postconditioning in experimental global cerebral ischemia,” Arter. Gipertenz., 17, No. 2, 182–188 (2011).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    T. Araki, H. Kato, and K. Kogure, “Selective neuronal vulnerability following transient cerebral ischemia in the gerbil: distribution and time course,” Acta Neurol. Scand., 80, 548–553 (1989).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    G. A. Donnan, P. Zapf, A. E. Doyle, and P. F. Bladin, “CSF enzyme in lacunar and cortical stroke,” Stroke, 14, No. 2, 266–269 (1983).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    T. Kagiyama, A. V. Glushakov, C. Sumners, et al., “Neuroprotective action of halogenated derivatives of L-phenylalanine,” Stroke, 35, 1192–1196 (2004).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    J. M. Kim, S. Kim, D. H. Kim, et al., “Neuroprotective effect of forsythiaside against transient cerebral global ischemia in gerbil,” Eur. J. Pharmacol., 660, No. 2–3, 326–333 (2011).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    T. Kirino, “Delayed neuronal death in the gerbil hippocampus following ischemia,” Brain Res., 239, 57–69 (1982).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    K. Kitagawa, M. Matsumoto, M. Tagaya, et al., “‘Ischemic tolerance’ phenomenon found in the brain,” Brain Res., 528, No. 1, 21–24 (1990).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    S. Levine and H. Payan, “Effects of ischemia and other procedures on the brain and retina of the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus),” Exp. Neurol., 16, No. 3, 255–262 (1966).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    W. J. Loskota, P. Lomax, and M. A. Verity, A Stereotaxic Atlas of the Mongolian Gerbil Brain, Ann Arbor Science Publishers, Ann Arbor (1974).Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    I. J. McWang, C. Anastasio, N. Hultman, et al., “The role of superoxide and nuclear factor-kappa B signaling in N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced necrosis and apoptosis,” J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther., 301, No. 2, 478–487 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    A. Mitani and K. Kataoka, “Critical levels of extracellular glutamate mediating gerbil hippocampal delayed neuronal death during hypothermia: brain microdialysis study,” Neuroscience, 42, No. 3, 661–670 (1991).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    J. W. Norris, V. C. Hachinski, M. G. Myers, et al., “Serum cardiac enzymes in stroke,” Stroke, 10, 548–553 (1979).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    N. Parakh, H. L. Gupta, and A. Jain, “Evaluation of enzymes in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in cases of stroke,” Neurol. India, 50, 518 (2002).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    K. Siraishi,Y. Takeda, K. Masui, et al., “Effect of fentanyl on ischemic depolarization and ischemic neuronal damage of hippocampal CA1 in the gerbil,” 25, No. 4, 540–548 (2011).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    M. L. Smith, R. N. Auer, and B. K. Siesjo, “The density and distribution of ischemic brain injury in the rat following 2–10 min of forebrain ischemia,” Acta Neuropathol., 64, 319–332 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    X. Wang, T. Mori, T. Sumii, and H. Eng, “Hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity in rat cerebral cortical neurons: Caspase activation and oxidative stress,” Stroke, 33, 1882–1888 (2002).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    H. Zhao, R. M. Sapolsky, and G. K. Steinberg, “Interrupting reperfusion as a stroke therapy: ischemic postconditioning reduces infarct size after focal ischemia in rats,” J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab., 26, No. 9, 1114–1121 (2006).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    J. G. Zhang, S. Ghosh, C. D. Ockleford, and M. Galinnes, “Characterization of an in vitro model for the study of the short and prolonged effects of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion in man,” Clin. Sci. (London), 99, 443–453 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. S. Shcherbak
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. M. Galagudza
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. A. Ovchinnikov
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. N. Kuz’menkov
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Yu. Yukina
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. R. Barantsevich
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. V. Tomson
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. V. Shlyakhto
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.St. Petersburg I. P. Pavlov State Medical UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.V. A. Almazov Federal Heart, Blood, and Endocrinology CenterRussian Ministry of Health and Social DevelopmentSt. PetersburgRussia

Personalised recommendations