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Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 42, Issue 9, pp 1074–1078 | Cite as

Dynamics of the Assimilation of an Imposed Rhythm by Neuron Assemblies in the Sensorimotor and Visual Cortical Areas of the Rabbit Brain

  • A. V. Bogdanov
  • A. G. Galashina
Article

The linked activity of pairs of neurons in the sensorimotor and visual zones of the cortex was analyzed in naïve rabbits, rabbits being trained, and trained rabbits during formation of a latent rhythmic focus of excitation (defensive dominant) in the central nervous system. During formation of the dominant in the cortex, there was a progressive increase in the proportion of neuron pairs whose linked activity was dominated by the rhythm applied by the experimental stimulation. In the sensorimotor zone of the cortex of trained rabbits, as compared with untrained animals, there were significantly greater proportions of pairs of both close-lying and distant neurons, whose linked activity was dominated by the rhythm imposed during stimulation. In the visual zone of the cortex, a significantly greater proportion of these pairs was see only when distant neurons were studied. Analysis of the interactions of neurons in the sensorimotor and visual areas of the cortex also revealed training-associated increases in the numbers of pairs with the activity rhythm imposed during the experiment when the influences of sensorimotor cortex neurons on visual cortex neurons and vice versa were analyzed.

Keywords

rabbits dominant focus multineural activity neural networks neural codes 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and NeurophysiologyRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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