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Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 41, Issue 5, pp 520–524 | Cite as

Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in School Maladaptation with Adaptol

  • L. S. Chutko
  • S. Yu. Surushkina
  • I. S. Nikishena
  • E. A. Yakovenko
  • T. I. Anisimova
  • A. M. Livinskaya
  • Yu. I. Sidorova
  • M. P. Kuzovenkova
  • K. A. Aitbekov
  • Yu. V. Mamaeva
Article

A total of 336 children aged 7–14 years with signs of school maladaptation (SMA) were studied. Anxiety disorders were detected in 167 (49.7%) of the cohort: generalized anxiety disorder in 87 (25.9%), phobic disorders in 40 (11.3%), separation-associated anxiety disorder in 14 (4.2%), and social anxiety disorder in 26 (7.7%). These rates were significantly different from a reference group (children without SMA). Children with generalized anxiety disorder (n = 32) were treated with Adaptol at a dose of 1000 mg/day for 30 days. Adaptol was found to be highly effective in terms of both clinical and psychological investigations, had good tolerance, and produced virtually no side effects.

Key words

school maladaptation anxiety disorders treatment Adaptol 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. S. Chutko
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Yu. Surushkina
    • 1
  • I. S. Nikishena
    • 1
  • E. A. Yakovenko
    • 1
  • T. I. Anisimova
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. M. Livinskaya
    • 1
  • Yu. I. Sidorova
    • 1
  • M. P. Kuzovenkova
    • 2
  • K. A. Aitbekov
    • 3
  • Yu. V. Mamaeva
    • 1
  1. 1.N. P. Bekhtereva Institute of the Human BrainRussian Academy of SciencesSt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.Faculty of Clinical PsychologySt. Petersburg Pediatric Medical AcademySt. PetersburgRussia
  3. 3.Neurotherapy CenterShymkentRepublic of Kazakhstan

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