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Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 39, Issue 3, pp 289–296 | Cite as

Microinjection of 70-kDal heat shock protein into the oral reticular nucleus of the pons suppresses rapid eye movement sleep in pigeons

  • E. A. Gusel’nikova
  • Yu. F. Pastukhov
Article

Previous studies have demonstrated that increases in the duration of slow-wave sleep and decreases in somatovisceral measures in response to microinjections of 70-kDal heat shock protein (Hsp70) into the third ventricle in pigeons may be due to activation of GABAA receptors in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. With the aim of identifying the transmitter mechanisms whose activation is temporally (2–3 h) linked with suppression of rapid eye movement sleep, the present studies were based on injection of Hsp70 into the oral reticular pontine nucleus (nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, NRPO), whose cholinergic neurons are critical for generating rapid eye movement sleep. Hsp70 was found to induce earlier (within the first 2 h) decreases in the number of episodes and the total duration of rapid eye movement sleep, with decreases in electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral power in the range 9–14 Hz, the level of muscle contractile activity, and brain temperature. It is hypothesized that the effects of Hsp70 are mediated by activation of GABAA receptors in the NRPO, evoking suppression of the cholinergic mechanisms initiating rapid eye movement sleep. The increase in the total duration of slow-wave sleep occurring with a long latent period (8–12 h after injection of Hsp70 into the NRPO) may be due to the influence of Hsp70 on the population of neurons responsible for maintaining slow-wave sleep outside the NRPO.

KEY WORDS

rapid eye movement sleep slow-wave sleep 70-kDal heat shock protein nucleus reticularis pontis oralis (oral reticular nucleus of the pons) pigeons 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.I. M. Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and BiochemistryRussian Academy of SciencesSt. PetersburgRussia

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