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Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology

, Volume 35, Issue 6, pp 623–628 | Cite as

Studies of Damage to Hippocampal Neurons in Inbred Mouse Lines in Models of Epilepsy Using Kainic Acid and Pilocarpine

  • N. P. Shikhanov
  • N. M. Ivanov
  • A. V. Khovryakov
  • K. Kaspersen
  • G. M. McCann
  • P. P. Kruglyakov
  • A. A. Sosunov
Article

Abstract

Identification of the mechanisms of damage to neurons is an important task in contemporary neuroscience and is of enormous importance in medicine. This report compares two models of neuron damage due to hyperexcitation induced by kainic acid and pilocarpine, using two lines of mice, C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ. Neuron damage was more marked in FVB mice, though lethality was greater in C57BL mice. The levels of convulsive activity were not significantly different. Kainic acid had greater tropism for the hippocampus than pilocarpine. Hsp-70 and Egr-1 expression was not significantly different in C57BL and FVB mice. Analysis of the isolated mitochondrial fraction showed that free radical production was different in these mouse lines; this may be one of the reasons for the differential resistance of neurons to hyperexcitation.

Key Words

neuron damage hippocampus inbred mice 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. P. Shikhanov
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • N. M. Ivanov
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. V. Khovryakov
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • K. Kaspersen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • G. M. McCann
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • P. P. Kruglyakov
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. A. Sosunov
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Cytology, Histology, and EmbryologyMordova State UniversitySaranskRussia
  2. 2.Normal Human AnatomyMordova State UniversitySaranskRussia
  3. 3.Department of NeurosurgeryColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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