Advertisement

Investigation of active biomolecules involved in the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles by Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam leaf extract

  • Xinde Jiang
  • Daohua Sun
  • Genlei Zhang
  • Ning He
  • Hongyu Liu
  • Jiale Huang
  • Tareque Odoom-Wubah
  • Qingbiao Li
Research Paper

Abstract

The effects of different biomolecules in Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam leaf extract on the morphology of obtained gold nanoparticles were investigated in this study. The results indicated that reducing sugars, flavones, and polyphenols consisting of about 79.8 % dry weight of the leaf extract were mainly involved in providing the dual function of reduction and the size/shape control during the biosynthesis. The gold nanoparticles present included 64 ± 10 nm nanospheres, 131 ± 18 nm nanoflowers, and 347 ± 136 nm (edge length) nanoplates and they were synthesized using the main content of reducing sugars, flavones, and polyphenols, respectively, after they were desorbed by the AB-8 macroporous adsorption resin column. Particularly, flower-like and triangular/hexagonal gold nanoparticles with a yield more than 80 % were obtained. Possible shape-directed agents for the nucleation and growth were characterized by FTIR, it can be seen that ketones were bound on the surface of the spherical and flower-like GNPs, while both the ketones and carbonyls bound on the Au {111} plane this may have favored the formation of the twin defects, which are very essential for nanoplates’ formation.

Keywords

Biosynthesis Biomolecule Gold nanoparticles Macroporous resin Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the NSFC projects (21206140, 21106117, and 21036004). The authors declare no competing financial interest.

References

  1. Andrei AB, Hassan YAE, Serban F (2012) FTIR spectrophotometric methods used for antioxidant activity assay in medicinal plants. Appl Spectros Rev 47(4):245–255CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Baliga MS, Shivashankara AR, Haniadka R, Dsouza J, Bhat HP (2011) Phytochemistry, nutritional and pharmacological properties of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam (jackfruit): a review. Food Res Int 44(7):1800–1811CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Boca S, Rugina D, Pintea A, Barbu-Tudoran L, Astilean S (2011) Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and their application as SERS-active tags inside living cells. Nanotechnology 22(5):055702CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chandran SP, Minakshi C, Pasricha R, Ahmad A, Sastry M (2006) Synthesis of gold nanotriangles and silver nanoparticles using Aloe vera plant extract. Biotechnol Prog 22:577–583CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Du M, Zhan G, Yang X, Wang H, Lin W, Zhou Y, Zhu J, Lin L, Huang J, Sun D, Jia L, Li Q (2011) Ionic liquid-enhanced immobilization of biosynthesized Au nanoparticles on TS-1 toward efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation. J Catal 283(2):192–201CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Gericke M, Pinches A (2006) Microbial production of gold nanoparticles. Gold Bull 1(39):22–28CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Graham HD (1992) Stabilization of the Prussian blue color in the determination of polyphenols. J Agric Food Chem 40:801–805CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Gu HF, Li CM, Xu YJ, Hu WF, Chen MH, Wan QH (2008) Structural features and antioxidant activity of tannin from Persimmon pulp. Food Res Int 41(2):208–217CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Huang J, Li Q, Sun D, Lu Y, Su Y, Yang X, Wang H, Wang Y, Shao W, He N, Hong J, Chen C (2007) Biosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles by novel sundried C. camphora leaf. Nanotechnology 18(10):105104CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Huang X, Tang S, Mu X, Dai Y, Chen G, Zhou Z, Ruan F, Yang Z, Zheng N (2011) Freestanding palladium nanosheets with plasmonic and catalytic properties. Nat Nanotechnol 6:28–32CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Iravani S (2011) Green synthesis of metal nanoparticles using plants. Green Chem 13(10):2638CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Jia Z, Tang M, Wu J (1999) The Determination of flavonoid contents in Mulberry and their scavenging effects on superoxide radicals. Food Chem 64:555–559CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Jiao J, Zhang Y, Liu C, Liu Je, Wu X, Zhang Y (2007) Separation and purification of Tricin from an antioxidant product derived from bamboo leaves. J Agric Food Chem 55(25):10086–10092CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Kasthuri J, Kathiravan K, Rajendiran N (2008) Phyllanthin-assisted biosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles: a novel biological approach. J Nanopart Res 11(5):1075–1085CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Korbekandi H, Iravani S, Abbasi S (2009) Production of nanoparticles using organisms. Crit Rev Biotechnol 29(4):279–306CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Kundu S, Pal A, Ghosh SK, Nath S, Panigrahi S, Praharaj S, Basu S, Pal T (2005) Shape-controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles from gold(III)-chelates of β-diketones. J Nanopart Res 7(6):641–650CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Li C, Shuford KL, Chen M, Lee EJ, Cho SO (2008) A facile polyol route to uniform gold octahedra with tailorable size and their optical properties. ACS Nano 2(9):1760–1769CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Miller GL (1959) Use of DinitrosaIicyIic acid reagent for determination of reducing sugar. Anal Chem 31(3):426–428CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Mohanpuria P, Rana NK, Yadav SK (2007) Biosynthesis of nanoparticles: technological concepts and future applications. J Nanopart Res 10(3):507–517CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Montes MO, Mayoral A, Deepak FL, Parsons JG, Jose-Yacamán M, Peralta-Videa JR, Gardea-Torresdey JL (2011) Anisotropic gold nanoparticles and gold plates biosynthesis using alfalfa extracts. J Nanopart Res 13(8):3113–3121CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Prakash O, Kumar R, Anurag M, Rajiv G (2009) Artocarpus heterophyllus (Jackfruit): an overview. Phcog Rev 3(6):353–358Google Scholar
  22. Shankar SS, Ahmad A, Pasricha R, Sastry M (2003) Bioreduction of chloroaurate ions by Geranium leaves and its endophytic fungus yields gold nanoparticles of different shapes. J Mater Chem 13(7):1822–1826CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Shankar SS, Rai A, Ankamwar B, Singh A, Ahmad A, Sastry M (2004) Biological synthesis of triangular gold nanoprisms. Nat Mater 3(7):482–488CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Silverstein RM, Webster FX, Kiemle DJ (2005) Proton NMR spectrometry. In: Spectrometric identification of organic compounds, 7th edn. Wiley, New York, pp 150–155Google Scholar
  25. Vermerris W, Nicholson R. (2006) Families of phenolic compounds and means of classification. In: Phenolic compound biochemistry. Springer, Bergisch Gladbach, pp 1–34Google Scholar
  26. Xia Y, Xiong Y, Lim B, Skrabalak SE (2009) Shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals: simple chemistry meets complex physics? Angew Chem Int Ed 48(1):60–103CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Xie J, Lee JY, Wang DIC, Ting YP (2007) Identification of active biomolecules in the high-yield synthesis of single-crystalline gold nanoplates in algal solutions. Small 3(4):672–682CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Zhan G, Huang J, Lin L, Lin W, Emmanuel K, Li Q (2011) Synthesis of gold nanoparticles by Cacumen platycladi leaf extract and its simulated solution: toward the plant-mediated biosynthetic mechanism. J Nanopart Res 13(10):4957–4968CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Zhan G, Huang J, Du M, Sun D, Abdul-Rauf I, Lin W, Hong Y, Li Q (2012a) Liquid phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with novel uncalcined bioreduction Au catalysts: high activity and durability. Chem Eng J 187:232–238CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Zhan G, Ke L, Li Q, Huang J, Hua D, Ibrahim AR, Sun D (2012b) Synthesis of gold nanoplates with bioreducing agent using syringe pumps: a kinetic control. Ind Eng Chem Res 51(48):15753–15762CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Zhang Q, Li N, Goebl J, Lu Z, Yin Y (2011) A systematic study of the synthesis of silver nanoplates: is citrate a “magic” reagent? J Am Chem Soc 133(46):18931–18939CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Zhou Y, Lin W, Huang J, Wang W, Gao Y, Lin L, Li Q, Lin L, Du M (2010) Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by foliar broths: roles of biocompounds and other attributes of the extracts. Nanoscale Res Lett 5(8):1351–1359CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xinde Jiang
    • 1
  • Daohua Sun
    • 1
  • Genlei Zhang
    • 1
  • Ning He
    • 1
  • Hongyu Liu
    • 1
  • Jiale Huang
    • 1
  • Tareque Odoom-Wubah
    • 1
  • Qingbiao Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical BiologyXiamen UniversityXiamenChina

Personalised recommendations