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Journal of Nanoparticle Research

, Volume 13, Issue 11, pp 6141–6147 | Cite as

Controlled self assembly of collagen nanoparticle

  • Massimiliano Papi
  • Valentina Palmieri
  • Giuseppe Maulucci
  • Giuseppe Arcovito
  • Emanuela Greco
  • Gianluca Quintiliani
  • Maurizio Fraziano
  • Marco De Spirito
Special Issue: Nanostructured Materials 2010

Abstract

In recent years carrier-mediated drug delivery has emerged as a powerful methodology for the treatment of various pathologies. The therapeutic index of traditional and novel drugs is enhanced via the increase of specificity due to targeting of drugs to a particular tissue, cell or intracellular compartment, the control over release kinetics, the protection of the active agent, or a combination of the above. Collagen is an important biomaterial in medical applications and ideal as protein-based drug delivery platform due to its special characteristics, such as biocompatibility, low toxicity, biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. While some many attempts have been made, further work is needed to produce fully biocompatible collagen hydrogels of desired size and able to release drugs on a specific target. In this article we propose a novel method to obtain spherical particles made of polymerized collagen surrounded by DMPC liposomes. The liposomes allow to control both the particles dimension and the gelling environment during the collagen polymerization. Furthermore, an optical based method to visualize and quantify each step of the proposed protocol is detailed and discussed.

Keywords

Drug delivery Collagen Atomic force microscopy Two-photon microscopy Second-harmonic generation Nanomedicine 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massimiliano Papi
    • 1
  • Valentina Palmieri
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Maulucci
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Arcovito
    • 1
  • Emanuela Greco
    • 2
  • Gianluca Quintiliani
    • 2
  • Maurizio Fraziano
    • 2
  • Marco De Spirito
    • 1
  1. 1.Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Istituto di FisicaRomeItaly
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of Rome ‘‘Tor Vergata”RomeItaly

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