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Journal of Nanoparticle Research

, Volume 13, Issue 5, pp 2063–2071 | Cite as

Monitoring of C60 aerosol concentrations during 4-week inhalation study using a carbon aerosol analyzer with adjusted analytical protocol

  • Toshihiko Myojo
  • Takako Oyabu
  • Akira Ogami
  • Masami Hirohashi
  • Masahiro Murakami
  • Makoto Yamamoto
  • Motoi Todoroki
  • Chikara Kadoya
  • Kenichiro Nishi
  • Sayumi Yamasaki
  • Yasuo Morimoto
  • Isamu Tanaka
  • Manabu Shimada
  • Shigehisa Endoh
Research Paper

Abstract

Fullerenes are interesting carbon nanomaterials with several forms of C60, C70, C76, and more molecules. However, little is known of the risk associated with their exposure. Inhalation is considered the most significant route of exposure to nanoparticles suspended in air, so we need suitable analytical methods of aerosol particles containing the fullerenes. Usually, fullerenes dissolved in organic solvents are analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. For aerosol samples on filters, any extraction process must be conducted before HPLC analysis. In this study, we used a carbon aerosol analyzer for diesel exhaust particulates to determine fullerene amount in aerosol particles without any extraction process. The filter samples were directly analyzed by this instrument within half hour. Our method was applied for aerosols of C60 with dispersant, which was sampled from a whole body exposure chamber for rats. Inhalation study was conducted for 4 weeks, 5 days a week, 6 h a day, and one filter sample was obtained from more than 5 h sampling of 6 h exposure. Average concentration of 19 samples of C60 aerosols for 4 week inhalation was 0.12 ± 0.03 mg/m3 calculated from total aerosol mass and weight fraction of C60 and 0.13 ± 0.03 mg/m3 measured by the carbon aerosol analyzer. Minimum determination limit of this method was <1 μg for filter samples. The limit was a hundred times higher than the HPLC technique but better than the gravimetric method using microbalance for filter samples.

Keywords

Fullerene Carbon aerosol analyzer Elemental carbon Nanoparticle Inhalation In vivo study EHS Manufactured nanomaterials 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was funded by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO) Grant “Evaluating Risks Associated with Manufactured Nanomaterials (P06041).”

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshihiko Myojo
    • 1
  • Takako Oyabu
    • 1
  • Akira Ogami
    • 1
  • Masami Hirohashi
    • 1
  • Masahiro Murakami
    • 1
  • Makoto Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Motoi Todoroki
    • 1
  • Chikara Kadoya
    • 1
  • Kenichiro Nishi
    • 1
  • Sayumi Yamasaki
    • 1
  • Yasuo Morimoto
    • 1
  • Isamu Tanaka
    • 1
  • Manabu Shimada
    • 2
  • Shigehisa Endoh
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Occupational and Environmental HealthKitakyushuJapan
  2. 2.Hiroshima UniversityHigashi-HiroshimaJapan
  3. 3.National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and TechnologyTsukubaJapan

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