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Journal of Nanoparticle Research

, Volume 10, Issue 5, pp 815–822 | Cite as

Multi-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor cell targeting biological transporters

  • Xiaoying Yang
  • Zhuohan Zhang
  • Zunfeng Liu
  • Yanfeng Ma
  • Rongcun Yang
  • Yongsheng Chen
Research Paper

Abstract

Multi-functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared and applied as tumor cell targeting biological transporters. A positive charge was introduced on SWNTs to get high loading efficiency of fluorescein (FAM) labeled short double strands DNA (20 base pairs). The SWNTs were encapsulated with the folic acid modified phospholipids for active targeting into tumor cell. The tumor cell-targeting properties of these multi-functionalized SWNTs were investigated by active targeting into mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells. The experimental results show that these multi-functionalized SWNTs have good tumor cell targeting property.

Keywords

Single-walled carbon nanotubes Tumor Targeted drugs Nanomedicine 

Notes

Acknowledgement

We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from MOE (#20040055020) and NSF founding of Tianjin city (#07JCYBJC01700).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoying Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhuohan Zhang
    • 3
  • Zunfeng Liu
    • 2
  • Yanfeng Ma
    • 2
  • Rongcun Yang
    • 3
  • Yongsheng Chen
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Pharmaceutical SciencesTianjin Medical University TianjinChina
  2. 2.Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology and Key Laboratory for Functional Polymer Materials, Institute of Polymer Chemistry Nankai University TianjinChina
  3. 3.Department of Immunology, College of Medicine, Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education Nankai UniversityTianjinChina

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