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Mycopathologia

, Volume 167, Issue 6, pp 351–353 | Cite as

First case of Microsporum ferrugineum from Tunisia

  • S. Neji
  • F. Makni
  • H. Sellami
  • F. Cheikhrouhou
  • A. Sellami
  • Ali Ayadi
Article

Abstract

This is the first case of Microsporum ferrugineum isolated from a Tunisian patient. A 60-year-old man was admitted for tinea sycosis associated with circinate herpes of the hand. Examination disclosed diffuse erythematic and perifollicular papules and pustules in the beard area. Typical ringworm vesiculo-pustular lesions involved skin of the hand. Isolates were identified as Microsporum sp on the basis of macroscopic and microscopic colony characteristics. The diagnosis of M. ferrugineum was confirmed by PCR sequencing of Chitin Synthase1 gene. The patient was treated successfully with Griseofulvin, which was administered for 4 weeks.

Keywords

Dermatophyte Tinea sycosis Microsporum ferrugineum Tunisia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Neji
    • 1
  • F. Makni
    • 1
  • H. Sellami
    • 1
  • F. Cheikhrouhou
    • 1
  • A. Sellami
    • 1
  • Ali Ayadi
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Parasitology–MycologySchool of Medecine SfaxSfaxTunisia

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