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Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 721–727 | Cite as

MiR-21 up-regulation mediates glioblastoma cancer stem cells apoptosis and proliferation by targeting FASLG

  • Chao Shang
  • Yan Guo
  • Yang Hong
  • Yun-hui Liu
  • Yi-xue Xue
Article

Abstract

To investigate whether miR-21 can affect the apoptosis and proliferation of glioblastoma cancer stem cells (GSCs) from down-regulating FASLG. The expression of miRNA-21 was detected by quantitative real-time PCR in normal brain tissue and glioblastoma samples, and the changes of miRNA-21 expression between GSCs and non-GSCs were also detected. The apoptosis and proliferation ability of miR-21 in GSCs were analyzed by MTT and flow cytometry assay after anti-miR-21 transfection. For the regulation mechanism analysis of miR-21, TargetScan, PicTar and microRNA were selected to predict some potential target genes of miR-21. The predicted gene was identified to be the direct and specific target gene of miR-21 by luciferase activities assay and western blot. RNA interference technology was used to confirm the apoptosis and proliferation effects of miR-21 were directly induced by FASLG. The expression of miR-21 increased significantly in glioblastoma contrast to normal brain tissue, and miR-21 up-regulated in GSCs remarkably. The proliferation of GSCs cell could be inhibited with high-expression of miR-21 and this effect could be restored by miR-21 knocked down. Mechanism analysis revealed that FASLG was a specific and direct target gene of miR-21. The advanced effects of anti-miR-21 on GSCs apoptosis and proliferation were mediated by expression of silenced FASLG. In summary, aberrantly expressed miR-21 regulates GSCs apoptosis and proliferation partly through directly down-regulating FASLG protein expression in GSCs and this might offer a new potential therapeutic stratagem for glioblastoma.

Keywords

Glioblastoma multiforme MiR-21 FASLG Cancer stem cells U87 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (81172408, 81301862, 81172197, 81272716).

Competing interests

All authors announce that there are not competing interests between them.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chao Shang
    • 1
  • Yan Guo
    • 2
  • Yang Hong
    • 3
  • Yun-hui Liu
    • 3
  • Yi-xue Xue
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurobiologyChina Medical UniversityShenyangPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Central Laboratory, School of StomatologyChina Medical UniversityShenyangPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing HospitalChina Medical UniversityShenyangPeople’s Republic of China

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