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Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 37, Issue 7, pp 3609–3613 | Cite as

Identification of three novel SNPs and association with carcass traits in porcine TNNI1 and TNNI2

  • Z. Y. Xu
  • H. Yang
  • Y. Z. Xiong
  • C. Y. Deng
  • F. E. Li
  • M. G. Lei
  • B. Zuo
Article

Abstract

In this study, two novel SNPs (EU743939:g.5174T>C in intron 4 and EU743939:g.8350C>A in intron 7) in TNNI1 and one SNP (EU696779:g.1167C>T in intron 3) in TNNI2 were identified by PCR–RFLP (PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism) using XbaI, MspI and SmaI restriction enzyme, respectively. The allele frequencies of three novel SNPs were determined in the genetically diverse pig breeds including ten Chinese indigenous pigs and three Western commercial pig breeds. Association analysis of the SNPs with the carcass traits were conducted in a Large White × Meishan F2 pig population. The linkage of two SNPs (g.5174T>C and g.8350C>A) in TNNI1 gene had significant effect on fat percentage. Besides these, the g.5174T>C polymorphism was also significantly associated with skin percentage (P < 0.05), shoulder fat thickness (P < 0.05) and backfat thickness between sixth and seventh ribs (P < 0.05). The significant effects of g.1167C>T polymorphism in TNNI2 gene on fat percentage (P < 0.01), lean meat percentage (P < 0.05), lion eye area (P < 0.05), thorax–waist backfat thickness (P < 0.01) and average backfat thickness (P < 0.05) were also found.

Keywords

Carcass trait Pig SNP TNNI1 TNNI2 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported financially by the Agricultural Innovation Fund of Hubei Province, National Key Technology R&D Program during the 11th Five Year Plan (2008BADB2B02), the National High Technology Development Project (2007AA10Z162; 2008AA101008), National Natural Science Foundation of P. R. China (30500358) and the National “973” Program of People’s Republic of China (2006CB102102).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. Y. Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Z. Xiong
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Y. Deng
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. E. Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. G. Lei
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. Zuo
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Science and Veterinary MedicineHuazhong Agricultural UniversityWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Key Lab of Agricultural Animal Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Veterinary MedicineHuazhong Agricultural UniversityWuhanPeople’s Republic of China

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