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Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 37, Issue 7, pp 3401–3406 | Cite as

First report on the molecular prevalence of Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (Mccp) in goats the cause of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) in Balochistan province of Pakistan

  • Mohammad Arif Awan
  • Ferhat Abbas
  • Masoom Yasinzai
  • Robin A. J. Nicholas
  • Shakeel Babar
  • Roger D. Ayling
  • Mohammad Adnan Attique
  • Zafar Ahmed
  • Abdul Wadood
  • Faisal Ameer Khan
Article

Abstract

Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (Mccp) is a disease of goats which causes high morbidity and mortality and is reported in many countries of the world. There are probably no reports on the molecular prevalence of Mccp, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum (Mcc) and Mycoplasma putrefaciens (Mp) in Balochistan and any other part of Pakistan. Thirty goats (n = 30) with marked respiratory symptoms were selected and procured from forty goat flocks in Pishin district of Balochistan in 2008. The genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from the lung samples (n = 30) of the slaughtered goats was purified and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for the presence of Mycoplasma mycoides cluster members and Mp. The PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) was also used to further confirm the Mccp. Of the thirty lung samples 17 (56.67%) were positive for the molecular prevalence of Mcc, Mccp and Mp. In total the molecular prevalence was observed as 17.65% for Mccp (n = 3), 70.59% for Mcc (n = 12) and 11.76% for Mp (n = 2). The RFLP profile has also validated the PCR results of Mccp by yielding two bands of 190 and 126 bp. The results of PCR-RFLP coupled with the presence of fibrinous pleuropneumonia and pleurisy during postmortem of goats (n = 3) strongly indicated the prevalence of CCPP in this part of world. Moreover the prevalence of Mcc and Mp is also alarming in the study area. We report for the very first time the molecular prevalence of Mcc, Mccp, and Mp in the lung tissues of goats in the Pishin district of Balochistan, Pakistan.

Keywords

Goats Mycoplasma CCPP PCR Balochistan Pakistan 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are highly thankful to Pakistan Agriculture Research Council (PARC) Islamabad for granting the project on Caprine Mycoplasmosis in Balochistan under the Agriculture Linkage Programme (ALP), the Center for Advanced Studies in Vaccinology & Biotechnology (CASVAB), University of Balochistan in providing all the paraphernalia for the molecular studies, Dr Jamil and Naseeb ullah, Faculty of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Balochistan University of Information Technology and Management Sciences (MUITMS) for their technical cooperation and inspiration and above all the excellent guidance and extra ordinary help of the members of Mycoplasma Group at Veterinary Laboratories Agency (Weybridge) UK is highly appreciated.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohammad Arif Awan
    • 1
  • Ferhat Abbas
    • 1
  • Masoom Yasinzai
    • 2
  • Robin A. J. Nicholas
    • 3
  • Shakeel Babar
    • 1
  • Roger D. Ayling
    • 3
  • Mohammad Adnan Attique
    • 1
  • Zafar Ahmed
    • 1
  • Abdul Wadood
    • 1
  • Faisal Ameer Khan
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Advanced Studies in Vaccinology and BiotechnologyUniversity of BalochistanQuettaPakistan
  2. 2.Institute of BiochemistryUniversity of BalochistanQuettaPakistan
  3. 3.Veterinary Laboratories Agency (Weybridge)AddlestoneUK

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