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Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 497–500 | Cite as

Associated analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms of IGF2 gene’s exon 8 with growth traits in Wuzhishan pig

  • Guanyu Hou
  • Dongjin Wang
  • Song Guan
  • Hongpu Zeng
  • Xianzhou Huang
  • Yuehui Ma
Article

Abstract

A new SNP located in IGF-2 gene of Wuzhishan pig was detected while a C → T silent mutation at position 17 of exon 8 was detected by Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphism (SSCP). The value of polymorphism information content (PIC) indicated that this locus had intermediate polymorphism information content (0.25 < PIC < 0.5). The results of the fitness of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was in disequilibrium (P < 0.01). SAS analysis together with the multiple comparisons between polymorphisms and growth traits showed that: the differences of carcass weight (P = 0.024), withers height (P = 0.037) and chest girth (P = 0.025) in 10-month-old generation group were very remarkable.

Keywords

Wuzhishan pig IGF2 gene Single nucleotide polymorphisms Growth traits Correlation analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This experiment was supported by National Nonprofit Institute Research Grant of CATAS-TCGRI (grant PZS-013) and Communion Platform Constructional Project for Livestock & Poultry Germplasm Resource (grant 2005DKA21101) as well.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guanyu Hou
    • 1
  • Dongjin Wang
    • 1
  • Song Guan
    • 1
  • Hongpu Zeng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xianzhou Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yuehui Ma
    • 2
  1. 1.Tropical Crops Genetic Resources Institute, CATASDanzhouChina
  2. 2.Institute of Animal ScienceChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesBeijingChina

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