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Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 237–243 | Cite as

Sequence conservation between porcine and human LRRK2

  • Knud Larsen
  • Lone Bruhn Madsen
Article

Abstract

Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a member of the ROCO protein superfamily (Ras of complex proteins (Roc) with a C-terminal Roc domain). Mutations in the LRRK2 gene lead to autosomal dominant Parkinsonism. We have cloned the porcine LRRK2 cDNA in an attempt to characterize conserved and therefore likely functional domains. The LRRK2 cDNA contains an open reading frame of 7,578 bp. The predicted LRRK2 protein consists of 2,526 amino acids of 86–93% identity with its mammalian couterparts. The deduced amino acid sequence of encoded porcine LRRK2 protein displays extensive homology with its human counterpart, with greatest similarities in those regions that contain the kinase domain, the Roc domain and the COR motif. Expression of porcine LRRK2 mRNA in various organs and tissues is similar to its human counterpart and not limited to the brain. The obtained data show that the LRRK2 sequence and expression patterns are conserved across species. The porcine LRRK2 gene was mapped to chromosome 5q25. The results obtained suggest that the LRRK2 gene might be of particular interest in our attempt to generate a transgenic porcine model for Parkinson’s disease.

Keywords

Dardarin Parkinson’s disease Porcine homologue 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge Dr. Martine Yerle of INRA Toulouse, France for providing the pig-rodent hybrid panel. The authors wish to thank Connie Jakobsen Juhl and Helle Jensen for excellent technical assistance, Dr. Lise Lotte Christensen for critically reading of the manuscript and Dr. Rikke K.K. Vingborg for help with artwork. This work was supported by a grant from the Danish Parkinson Association.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Faculty of Agricultural SciencesUniversity of AarhusTjeleDenmark

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