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The Value Of Public Participation During a Hazard, Impact, Risk And Vulnerability (HIRV) Analysis

  • Laurie Pearce
Article

Abstract

The first part of this paper discusses the links between hazard, risk and vulnerability (HRV) analysis and the development of mitigative strategies. The second part discusses the need to include public participation when completing an HRV analysis. Two current HRV models are used to illustrate the general failure of HRV analysis to include public participation. The third part of this paper provides a brief overview of the Hazard, Impact, Risk and Vulnerability (HIRV) model and its use of public participation. The paper concludes by offering a synopsis of a case study in the town and regional area surrounding Barriere, British Columbia, Canada. This case study demonstrates a positive outcome when public participation is incorporated into an HIRV analysis.

Keywords

case study disaster management hazard risk and vulnerability analysis public participation sustainable hazard mitigation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaNorth VancouverCanada

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