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Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 239–240 | Cite as

Cosmetic neurology: the role of healthcare professionals

  • Kinan Muhammed
Short Communication

Abstract

In an age of modern technology and an increasing movement towards a 24-h working culture, life for many is becoming more stressful and demanding. To help juggle these work commitments and an active social life, nootropic medication, (the so-called ‘smart pills’) have become a growing part of some people’s lives. Users claim that these drugs allow them to reach their maximal potential by becoming more efficient, smarter and requiring less sleep. The use of these medications and the role of health professionals in their distribution raises many ethical questions.

Keywords

Cognitive enhancement Cosmetic neurology Ethics Neurology Nootropics Smart pills 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Imperial College Healthcare NHS TrustLondonUK

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