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Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 147–160 | Cite as

A theory of health science and the healing arts based on the philosophy of Bernard Lonergan

  • Patrick R. Daly
Article

Abstract

This paper represents a preliminary investigation relating Bernard Lonergan’s thought to health science and the healing arts. First, I provide background for basic elements of Lonergan’s theoretical terminology that I employ. As inquiry is the engine of Lonergan’s method, next I specify two questions that underlie medical insights and define several terms, including health, disease, and illness, in relation to these questions. Then I expand the frame of reference to include all disciplines involved in the cycle of clinical interaction under the heading health science and the healing arts. Finally, I analyze the cycle of clinical interaction in terms of Lonergan’s cognitive theory. I compare and contrast my analysis, based on Lonergan, with that of Pellegrino, Thomasma and Sulmasy as I proceed. In closing, I comment briefly on the next stage of this project regarding Lonergan’s theory of the human good in relation to the practice of the healing arts.

Keywords

Diagnosis Disease Health Philosophy, Medical Injury 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The author wishes to thank Patrick Byrne, PhD, for his guidance in the study of Lonergan’s philosophy.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Togus VAMCAugustaUSA

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