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Metallurgist

, Volume 50, Issue 11–12, pp 634–637 | Cite as

Treating steel outside the furnace more efficiently

  • V. A. Golubtsov
  • L. G. Shub
  • A. A. Deryabin
  • R. G. Usmanov
Article

Abstract

The rate and extent of desulfurization and vacuum degassing of steel during its treatment outside the furnace should be determined by the quality characteristics and service properties required of the given steel. The ability of the chosen inoculation technology to improve the quality of the steel should also be considered in this determination. To make inoculation more effective, it is necessary to use complex master alloys that contain calcium, barium, aluminum, rare-earth meals, and other active elements. It would also be best to transfer the inoculation operation from the ladle to the casting equipment (thus adding the inoculant directly to the fountain, tundish, or continuous-caster mold).

Keywords

Desulfurization Master Alloy Nonmetallic Inclusion Calcium Aluminate Rail Steel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. A. Golubtsov
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. G. Shub
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. A. Deryabin
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. G. Usmanov
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Tekhnologiya CorporationRussia
  2. 2.Ural Institute of MetalsRussia

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