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Meccanica

, Volume 48, Issue 7, pp 1695–1700 | Cite as

Phase transitions and thermodynamics for the shape memory alloy AuZn

  • M. Fabrizio
  • M. Pecoraro
Article

Abstract

A model for shape memory alloys described by a intermediate pattern between a first and a second order phase transition is studied. Moreover, by the thermodynamic compatibility of the model, we provide suitable restrictions on the potentials of the Ginzburg-Landau system. Finally, we present numerical simulations of this shape memory model, which are in good agreement with experimental data.

Keywords

Phase transitions Shape memory alloys Ginzburg-Landau equation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors have been partially supported by G.N.F.M.–I.N.D.A.M. and the first author by University of Bologna.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of MathematicsUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  2. 2.DMIUniversity of SalernoSalernoItaly

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