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Metabolic Brain Disease

, Volume 31, Issue 4, pp 827–835 | Cite as

Time dependent impact of perinatal hypoxia on growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3

  • Ömer Kartal
  • Seçil Aydınöz
  • Ayşe Tuğba Kartal
  • Taha Kelestemur
  • Ahmet Burak Caglayan
  • Mustafa Caglar Beker
  • Ferhan Karademir
  • Selami Süleymanoğlu
  • Mustafa Kul
  • Burak Yulug
  • Ertugrul Kilic
Original Article

Abstract

Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) is a widely used animal model to mimic the preterm or perinatal sublethal hypoxia, including hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It causes diffuse neurodegeneration in the brain and results in mental retardation, hyperactivity, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and neuroendocrine disturbances. Herein, we examined acute and subacute correlations between neuronal degeneration and serum growth factor changes, including growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) after hypoxic-ischemia (HI) in neonatal rats. In the acute phase of hypoxia, brain volume was increased significantly as compared with control animals, which was associated with reduced GH and IGF-1 secretions. Reduced neuronal survival and increased DNA fragmentation were also noticed in these animals. However, in the subacute phase of hypoxia, neuronal survival and brain volume were significantly decreased, accompanied by increased apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus and cortex. Serum GH, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 levels were significantly reduced in the subacute phase of HI. Significant retardation in the brain and body development were noted in the subacute phase of hypoxia. Here, we provide evidence that serum levels of growth-hormone and factors were decreased in the acute and subacute phase of hypoxia, which was associated with increased DNA fragmentation and decreased neuronal survival.

Keywords

Perinatal hypoxia Brain injury Apoptosis Serum GH IGF-1 IGFBP-3 levels 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by EMBO (European Molecular Biology Organization) installation Grant and The Turkish Academy of Sciences (TUBA).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ömer Kartal
    • 1
    • 2
  • Seçil Aydınöz
    • 2
  • Ayşe Tuğba Kartal
    • 1
    • 3
  • Taha Kelestemur
    • 1
  • Ahmet Burak Caglayan
    • 1
  • Mustafa Caglar Beker
    • 1
  • Ferhan Karademir
    • 2
  • Selami Süleymanoğlu
    • 2
  • Mustafa Kul
    • 2
  • Burak Yulug
    • 1
  • Ertugrul Kilic
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology, Regenerative and Restorative Medical Research CenterIstanbul Medipol UniversityIstanbulTurkey
  2. 2.Department of Pediatrics, Gulhane Military Medical AcademyHaydarpasa Teaching HospitalIstanbulTurkey
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsMarmaris State HospitalMuglaTurkey

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