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Metabolic Brain Disease

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 1009–1016 | Cite as

Increased brain iron deposition is a risk factor for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis: a combined study of quantitative susceptibility mapping and whole brain volume analysis

  • Chao Chai
  • Mengjie Zhang
  • Miaomiao Long
  • Zhiqiang Chu
  • Tong Wang
  • Lijun Wang
  • Yu Guo
  • Shuo Yan
  • E. Mark Haacke
  • Wen Shen
  • Shuang Xia
Research Article

Abstract

To explore the correlation between increased brain iron deposition and brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis and their correlation with clinical biomarkers and neuropsychological test. Forty two patients with haemodialysis and forty one age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this prospective study. 3D whole brain high resolution T1WI and susceptibility weighted imaging were scanned on a 3 T MRI system. The brain volume was analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in patients and to compare with that of healthy controls. Quantitative susceptibility mapping was used to measure and compare the susceptibility of different structures between patients and healthy controls. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between the brain volume, iron deposition and neuropsychological scores. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to explore the effect of clinical biomarkers on the brain volumes in patients. Compared with healthy controls, patients with haemodialysis showed decreased volume of bilateral putamen and left insular lobe (All P < 0.05). Susceptibilities of bilateral caudate head, putamen, substantia nigra, red nucleus and dentate nucleus were significantly higher (All P < 0.05). The increased brain iron deposition is negatively correlated with the decreased volume of bilateral putamen (P < 0.01). Neuropsychological scores positively correlated with decreased volume of left insular lobe (P < 0.05). Dialysis duration was negatively associated with decreased volume of bilateral putamen (P < 0.05). Our study indicated increased brain iron deposition and dialysis duration was risk factors for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis. The decreased gray matter volume of the left insular lobe was correlated with neurocognitive impairment.

Keywords

Haemodialysis Cerebral atrophy Voxel-based morphometry Iron deposition Neurocognitive dysfuction 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Supported by a grant from China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (grant No. 201150 M1573 to S. X.).

Conflict of interest

The authors disclose no conflicts.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chao Chai
    • 1
  • Mengjie Zhang
    • 1
  • Miaomiao Long
    • 1
  • Zhiqiang Chu
    • 2
  • Tong Wang
    • 2
  • Lijun Wang
    • 2
  • Yu Guo
    • 1
  • Shuo Yan
    • 1
  • E. Mark Haacke
    • 3
  • Wen Shen
    • 1
  • Shuang Xia
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical ImagingTianjin First Central HospitalTianjinChina
  2. 2.Department of HaemodialysisTianjin First Central HospitalTianjinChina
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyWayne State UniversityDetroitUSA

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