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Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

, Volume 279, Issue 1–2, pp 75–84 | Cite as

Human lung cell growth is not stimulated by lead ions after lead chromate-induced genotoxicity

  • Sandra S. Wise
  • Amie L. Holmes
  • Jonathan A. Moreland
  • Hong Xie
  • Sarah J. Sandwick
  • Megan M. Stackpole
  • Elena Fomchenko
  • Sonia Teufack
  • Alfred J. MayJr.
  • Spiros P. Katsfis
  • John Pierce WiseSr.
Article

Abstract

Chromate compounds are known human lung carcinogens. Water solubility is an important factor in the carcinogenicity of these compounds with the most potent carcinogenic compounds being water-insoluble or ‘particulate’. Previously we have shown that particulate chromates dissolve extracellularly releasing chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) ions and only the Cr ions induce genotoxicity. Pb ions have been considered to have epigenetic effects and it is thought that these may enhance the carcinogenic activity of lead chromate, perhaps by stimulating Cr-damaged cells to divide. However, this possibility has not been directly tested. Accordingly, we investigated the ability of Pb ions to stimulate human lung cells and possibly force lead chromate-damaged cells to grow. We found that at concentrations of lead chromate that induced damage, human lung cells exhibited cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition that were very similar to those observed for sodium chromate. Moreover, we found that soluble Pb ions were not growth stimulatory to human lung cells and in fact induced progressive mitotic arrest. These data indicate that lead chromate-generated Cr ions cause growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest and that Pb does not induce epigenetic effects that stimulate chromate-damaged cells to grow.

Key Words

chromate cytotoxicity lead particulate 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra S. Wise
    • 1
  • Amie L. Holmes
    • 1
  • Jonathan A. Moreland
    • 1
  • Hong Xie
    • 1
  • Sarah J. Sandwick
    • 1
  • Megan M. Stackpole
    • 1
  • Elena Fomchenko
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sonia Teufack
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alfred J. MayJr.
    • 1
  • Spiros P. Katsfis
    • 2
  • John Pierce WiseSr.
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental HealthUniversity of Southern MainePortlandUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of BridgeportBridgeportUSA
  3. 3.Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental HealthUniversity of Southern MainePortlandUSA

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