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Marketing Letters

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 675–686 | Cite as

The effects of the experience recommendation on short- and long-term happiness

  • Maria Sääksjärvi
  • Katarina Hellén
  • Pieter Desmet
Article

Abstract

Previous research has argued that in order to become happier, consumers should prefer experiences over material objects. However, this experience recommendation is based upon measures of short-term happiness. In two empirical studies, we test the experience recommendation for both short- as well as long-term happiness. In line with previous results, it was found that the experience recommendation holds for short-term happiness but data did not support the superiority of the experience recommendation for long-term happiness. More specifically, it was documented that adding a material component to the experience had the best effect upon long-term happiness.

Keywords

Happiness Experience recommendation Happiness-enhancing activities 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Sääksjärvi
    • 1
  • Katarina Hellén
    • 2
  • Pieter Desmet
    • 3
  1. 1.Department Product Innovation ManagementDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Faculty of Business StudiesUniversity of VaasaVaasaFinland
  3. 3.Industrial Design EngineeringDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands

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