Role of individuals’ virtues in relationship between emotional responses to government’s actions and their consequences

Abstract

In this paper, we aim to investigate the type of emotional responses that are evoked by the government’s actions and whether these emotions lead to individuals’ support behavior. We use scenario-based experimental design where two between-subjects manipulations are created for government’s actions, and one between-subjects control condition is created. Respondents were assigned to experimental and control groups using judgmental sampling. PLS based SEM and CFA is used for the analyses of the data.

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Appendices

Appendix 1: Narrative scenario for government’s responsible behavior

“Make in India” is a major international marketing strategy that has been initiated by the central government in September 2014 to attract investment from across the globe. The campaign has been initiated to boost job creation, develop the economy and convert India into a self-sustaining country by providing global recognition for its support of business and entrepreneurship. The major objectives of this campaign include transforming India into a global manufacturing hub, eliminating unnecessary laws constraining commerce, and making Indian bureaucratic processes run faster and smoother and the system of government more transparent, accountable, and responsive. The government’s emphasis is on a framework that would include time bound project clearances through a single online portal which would be supported by a multi-member team to clear all sort of investors’ queries within 48 h.

The government’s focus is on public and private partnerships, which will help to increase the contribution of the manufacturing sector in India and raise the GDP substantially. The emphasis is also on skill development and education of workers and protection of Intellectual property to encourage business innovation and investment in the economy. India is regarded as one of the best destinations in the Asian continent as it is a vibrant democracy with huge potential. The government now provides support for de-licensing and deregulation of industry. India definitely is on a high growth trajectory. The “Make in India” initiative also aims at identifying domestic companies with high potential and leadership in Innovation and new technology for turning them into global leaders with new government support programs. The focus is on promoting green and sustainable manufacturing so as to help these companies become an important part of the global value chain. “Make in India” campaign promises to jump-start the economy and transform India into a major player on the world stage.

Appendix 2: Narrative scenario for government’s irresponsible behavior

“Make in India” is a major international marketing strategy that has been initiated by the central government in September 2014 to attract investment from across the globe. “Make in India” aims to stimulate growth in India. However, it can turn out to be a major factor contribution to environmental degradation and resource depletion. This may lead to negative effects on the economy, environment, and health. It is a common experience that the freer the trade and capital movement is, the more harm than good results specially when lax environment laws do little to curb polluting industries in India. Land acquisition for the purpose of establishment of manufacturing industries by the government has been an issue of concern. People don’t have proper housing and jobs. For purposes of industrialization, trees are being harvested at alarming rates, and human welfare is compromised. Hence loss of biodiversity, major climatic changes, soil erosion, air pollution, water pollution can be potentially caused by the “Make in India” campaign. Carbon emissions is another issue that needs to be addressed, as any effort by government to convert India into a global manufacturing hub will produce tremendous increases in such emissions, with negative impact on the environment and public health.

India is the world’s fourth largest energy consumer and with the “Make in India” initiative, obviously its energy needs will continue to increase. But energy shortages at a national level and a deficient energy infrastructure risk undermining “Make in India” campaign. Perception of public harm may further stigmatize India in the eyes of the world as a hopelessly faltering economy and country.

Appendix 3: Narrative scenario for control condition

On 2nd October 2014, Prime Minister Modi launched a project known as the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan (The Clean India Campaign) to create “Clean India” by October 2, 2019, the 150th birthday of Mahatma Gandhi. The project aims to improve sanitation around India. This project is one in a long-line of sanitation efforts, the two most recent being the Central Rural Sanitation Program begun it 1986 and the Total Sanitation Project of 1999 (renamed Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan). Many government agencies are coordinating their efforts with the new clean India Campaign.

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Gaur, S.S., Anand, I.M. Role of individuals’ virtues in relationship between emotional responses to government’s actions and their consequences. J Manag Gov 24, 327–364 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10997-018-9445-5

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Keywords

  • Government actions
  • Virtues
  • Emotions
  • Public support
  • Scenario-based experiment
  • Emerging economy