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Maternal and Child Health Journal

, Volume 19, Issue 2, pp 247–251 | Cite as

The Evolving Role of Leadership and Change in Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology

  • Michael D. Kogan
  • Wanda Barfield
  • Charlan Kroelinger
Commentary

Beginning in the 1980s, there was a growing recognition of the need to quantify the work and contributions of state maternal and child health (MCH) departments [1]. In 1987, the Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program (MCHEP) was initiated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) to provide epidemiologic leadership for State MCH programs [2, 3]. The success of the MCHEP spawned subsequent initiatives to build MCH data capacity including the development of a National Action Agenda, which was led by the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) and CityMatch, and included other national organizations such as the Association of Schools of Public Health, the Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), and the National Association of County and City Health Officials [4, 5]. The...

Keywords

Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System Title Versus Program Assist Reproductive Technology Birth National Action Agendum Youth Risk Behavioral Surveillance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael D. Kogan
    • 1
  • Wanda Barfield
    • 2
  • Charlan Kroelinger
    • 2
  1. 1.Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health BureauRockvilleUSA
  2. 2.Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaGeorgia

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