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Amide 1 Expression in Psoriasis and Lichen Planus using Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy

  • Ahmed EL Bedewi
  • Randa Yousef
  • Dalia Abdel Halim
  • Rehab Hegazy
  • William Willis
  • Lisa M. Miller
  • Medhat EL Mofty
Article
  • 125 Downloads

Abstract

Psoriasis vulgaris and, Lichen planus are cutaneous inflammatory conditions that usually exhibit distinctive morphology. Ten psoriasis vulgaris and, ten Lichen planus patients (mean age, 45 ± 10.27 years) with confirmed histopathological diagnoses were analyzed. In the current study synchrotron infrared (IR) microspectroscopy was used to differentiate between these two conditions based on their lymphocytic proteins analyses. It was found that β-sheets protein structure, known to represent cell apoptosis, were expressed significantly in Lichen planus conditions than that of the psoriasis vulgaris when analyzed against the established normal control groups of five patients of comparable age and, genders (P = 0.001, 0.03 respectively). Also, the amide 1 protein type within the epidermis of Lichen planus were expressed in significant proportions as compared to psoriasis vulgaris (P < 0.001). On the contrary, the amide 1 protein structural types were found clustered in psoriasis vulgaris in different IR spectra than that in Lichen planus as observed in a number of patients during this study. These observations indicated that the concentration of amide 1 protein in psoriasis vulgaris varies to that of Lichen planus. In conclusion, both psoriasis vulgaris and, Lichen planus have different types of epidermal and, dermal protein structures and, this information can be of clinical diagnostic and therapeutic use for these cutaneous inflammatory conditions in near future.

Keywords

Psoriasis Lichen planus Amide 1 Fourier-transform infra red micro-spectroscopy (FT–IRM) Fourier-transform infra red (FT–IR) 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Special thanks for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Research Program for SESAME for supporting this work.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ahmed EL Bedewi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Randa Yousef
    • 2
  • Dalia Abdel Halim
    • 2
  • Rehab Hegazy
    • 2
  • William Willis
    • 3
  • Lisa M. Miller
    • 3
  • Medhat EL Mofty
    • 2
  1. 1.National Center for Radiation Research and TechnologyCairoEgypt
  2. 2.Dermatology Department, Faculty of MedicineCairo UniversityCairoEgypt
  3. 3.National Synchrotron Light SourceBrookhaven National LaboratoryUptonUSA

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